Designers Guild “Savine”

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Designers Guild Savine

Designers Guild Savine

This is a Designers Guild pattern, “Savine”, that we installed in the two-story foyer of a Cranberry Township, Pa, home. The material was wonderful to work with. It was a heavyweight, paper-backed vinyl which came in a super-euro roll size of 27-inches wide by 11-yards long. We primed the walls with a clear wallcovering primer. The wallpaper was hung using a 50-50 mixture of Roman’s 880 and Roman’s 838. Either paste would have been fine on its own, but I prefer the combination of the two adhesives, which provides the best of both worlds: superior tack and extended working time.

 

 

Designers Guild Savine

Designers Guild Savine

One of the challenges posed by the installation was to preserve the arrangement of several family photographs that made up this rogue’s gallery in the stairwell. We took photos of the arrangement before taking down and labeling each picture. In order to save the exact spot for each picture, we removed the hook, then removed the nail from the hook, and then placed the nail back into its hole in the wall. As we installed the wallpaper over the nails, we sliced a tiny “x” in the wallpaper at each nail head and pulled it through the wallpaper. It’s the same method we would use to pull a thermostat or an alarm panel through the wallpaper.

 

 

Designers Guild Savoine

Designers Guild Savine

We used a two-stage scaffold, a five-way Werner ladder, and a couple of aluminum planks to rig this space for access to the walls. The chandelier had to be tied-off to the second-floor railings in order to make room for the scaffold.

 

 

Designers Guild Savine

Designers Guild Savine

As always, we strive for a pattern layout that is centered over the front door in such a way that it breaks at the corners in the most visually pleasing way possible.

 

 

flora_kandy

Elitis Kandy

Bonus photo: Elitis “Kandy” wallcovering, installed in the front room of the same home. The interior designer was Betsy Wentz, of Studio B, in Sewickley, Pa.